First Drive

First Drive: Jaguar F-Pace PHEV

The story:
Like its E-Pace smaller sibling, the F-Pace has been given a considerable mid-life makeover, including new infotainment, front and rear styling and new powertrains, including a company car-friendly plug-in hybrid
Category:SUV
Key rival:BMW X3
JAGUAR F-PACE P400E PHEV SE
Price:£58,930
MPG:124.5mpg
Emissions:51g/km
On sale:Now

Jaguar’s F-Pace has reached middle age, so has received a significant update to its styling, technology, powertrains and interior, with a new plug-in hybrid model headlining the range from a company car point of view.

First Drive - April 2021 - Jaguar F-Pace PHEV - Image 8The PHEV gets under 50g/km for CO2 emissions, although only in the entry S of the five trim levels, with the larger wheels tipping the rest into a BiK band that’s one higher. It manages an official electric-only range figure of 30-33 miles depending on trim level, and combines a 300hp petrol engine and electric motor for a pretty potent total of 400hp.

The F-Pace has always sat comfortably at the performance end of the SUV scale, and the potent powertrain compliments that position. The Jaguar feels very direct and fast, and the system switches slickly between petrol and electric, or both at once, with the only complaint being a slightly lumpy ride quality that befits the more sporting set-up of the car.

First Drive - April 2021 - Jaguar F-Pace PHEV - Image 1The PHEV has three drive modes of EV, Hybrid and Save, with the hybrid mode offering a little electricity symbol on the rev counter to show how far to push the accelerator before the engine kicks in.

The F-Pace has new slender front and rear LED lights that are included in the external redesign.

It has also been revised on the inside; the new Pivi Pro infotainment system is claimed to offer most frequently used features with one click from the home screen, and the majority of others within two clicks, and the screen display is clean and attractive, as well as being larger than the one it replaced. The only bad news is that it’s not integrated completely into the dashboard, so looks a little more temporary than a premium interior deserves. But Jaguar is far from alone in going down that route, with Mercedes-Benz, for example, a long-time culprit.

The leather seats are wide and comfortable, and a stubby gearlever replaces the previous rotating dial for engaging gears.

Other changes in the mid-life update include new mild hybrid additions to the petrol and diesel engines to improve efficiency, new technology and the enabling of over-the-air software updates.

paul barker

The verdict

Nice update of what may be Jaguar’s most competitive model. But the PHEV is priced high against prestige rivals.