First Drive

First Drive: Vauxhall Crossland X Elite Nav

The story:
Vauxhall’s new 1.5-litre diesel engine has reached the Crossland X, coming in 102hp form rather than the 120hp version in the bigger Grandland X SUV.
Category:Compact Crossover
Key rival:Citroen C3 Aircross
Vauxhall Crossland X Elite Nav 1.5D 102hp
Price:£21,490
MPG:70.6mpg
Emissions:105g/km
On sale:Now

Vauxhall’s new 1.5-litre diesel engine has reached the Crossland X, although here it’s in 102hp form rather than the 120hp version in the bigger Grandland X SUV.

Vauxhall’s baby crossover model has been given a revised engine line-up, with the new 102hp 1.5 being the only diesel option, along with three petrol engines.

Available in all bar the new top Ultimate spec, the latest diesel engine is reasonable enough, although you need to work it a bit hard.

Nevertheless, it comes in a car that is well-equipped, with even the entry SE trim getting a 7.0-inch touchscreen with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, dual-zone climate control and automatic lights and wipers, while all bar the SE get an 8.0-inch screen and sat-nav.First Drive-March 2019-Vauxhall Crossland X-Image 2

The unit’s biggest problem is an internal one, in that its 105g/km emissions figure is only 4g/km better than the 110hp 1.2 Ecotec petrol alternative. Thanks to the petrol’s lower price and the four-band benefit-in-kind penalty for diesels, it means that company car tax will be £17 lower in this tax year for the petrol. That gives it about half a tank of fuel in hand every month to make up for the 13.0mpg difference in economy. So a driver will have to be doing big miles to make the sums add up.

Combine that with the Crossland X not being the most elegant design among the compact crossover sector, and that others are also nicer to drive and have lower running costs, and it makes the diesel Crossland X a tricky sell.

 

Paul Barker

The verdict

The Crossland X diesel isn’t Vauxhall’s most competitive model. It’s in the same ballpark as rival diesels, but in this size of vehicle, petrol models are close enough on emissions to make more sense in all bar the highest-mileage cases.