Ford has confirmed it will release mild-hybrid versions of its Fiesta small car and Focus lower medium model next year.

The brand said these additions to the respective line-ups will help the brand offer “one of the most comprehensive and compelling vehicle line-ups and bring the benefits of electrification to greater numbers of consumers.”

Both models will feature a mild-hybrid system which has been tailored to enhance fuel-efficiency, the firm said. A belt-driven integrated starter/generator (BISG) replaces the standard alternator, enabling recovery and storage of energy usually lost during braking and coasting to charge a 48-volt lithium-ion air-cooled battery pack.

The BISG also acts as a motor, integrating with the three-cylinder 1.0‑litre petrol and using the stored energy to provide torque assistance during normal driving and acceleration, as well as running the vehicle’s electrical ancillaries.

According to Ford, the Fiesta mild-hybrid is expected to emit 112g/km of CO2 while the Focus mild-hybrid model is expected to emit 106g/km of CO2.

Secret Diary - 28th January 2019 - Ford Focus Active X - Image 8

“Our new Fiesta and Focus EcoBoost Hybrid models are examples of Ford’s commitment to deliver new, more environmentally sustainable vehicles, sophisticated technologies, and valued services for our customers,” said Steven Armstrong, group vice president and president of Europe, Middle East and Africa at Ford. “We’ve gone to every length to develop mild-hybrid powertrains for two of our most popular cars that will help keep cash in customers’ pockets while remaining true to the Ford ‘fun to drive’ philosophy.”

Roelant de Waard, vice president of marketing, sales and service at Ford of Europe added: “Our 1.0-litre EcoBoost engine has already proven that fuel-efficiency and performance can go hand-in-hand. Our EcoBoost Hybrid technology takes that to the next level. We believe customers are going to love the smooth and urgent power delivery of our EcoBoost Hybrid powertrains just as much as they’ll enjoy less-frequent trips to the fuel pumps.”