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Long Term Test: Hyundai Ioniq PHEV

Charging cables

Long-term test reviews

20 May 2020

Hyundai Ioniq TTT 2020

Lockdown has put many parts of everyday life on hold and unfortunately that’s included the fitting of our car charging point.

In fairness though, lockdown has only been one of the problems. Having moved out of London at the turn of the year, fitting a charging point was high on our to-do list, but sorting it out has been far from simple even with Podpoint’s help. Our new home had been previously extended and the fusebox that was in the garage is now in the kitchen in the middle of the house.

Furthermore, the dated wiring of the fusebox itself (or more precisely how the power actually comes into the fusebox) means that Podpoint’s initial suggestion was to take a whole new feed from the road pulling up the newly-laid kitchen floor in the process. Preferring my teeth to remain in my mouth, I didn’t bother mentioning this option to Mrs B.

The next plan was to arrange an engineer visit to see if we could solve the problem by some other, easier, means. Lockdown has put paid to that, meaning we’re still relying on a three-pin plug, which certainly hasn’t been a hardship but does restrict us running a full EV in the future. Fingers crossed we can find another option that involves keeping our kitchen floor intact and me not being on first-name terms with the dentist.

Hyundai Ioniq TTT 2020In the meantime, keeping the Ioniq charged up for the relatively few short journeys we have been doing, has seen our average mpg rise once again. Despite the lack of regular miles too, our usual under-tree parking spot has seen it need regular washing – albeit with a little help from a home-schooling assistant…

nat barnes

Tester's notes

• Our experiences with fitting a home charging point underline how problematic it can be and just how the UK isn’t ready for a wholesale move to EVs…

• … and given that, the Ioniq thankfully comes with both a multi-pin and three-pin household plug charging cables as standard, but we’re stunned how many PHEVs only offer the latter often as a cost option.

The stats

Hyundai Ioniq Plug-in Hybrid Premium SE

P11D: £32,195

Official combined mpg: 256.8mpg

Our combined mpg: 83.6mpg

CO2: 26g/km

14 April 2020

Hyundai Ioniq LTT 2020

Before the lockdown began, we managed to take our long-term Hyundai Ioniq for a quick visit to a well-known Swedish furniture store for some new wardrobe doors, ticking off a long-outstanding job on the now ever-shortening DIY chores list.

Hyundai Ioniq LTT 2020 displayWe’ve commented on the Ioniq’s shallow 341-litre boot before, but this time it was length that was crucial and it proved up to the task. Ikea has fitted charging points in the car parks of all its UK stores, but then trying to find them in a large multi-storey when you’re on a short trip is a pain. A full charge before we left meant it wasn’t essential, so after two laps of the car park, we gave up looking.

A 35-mile round-trip with a decent chunk of motorway both ways meant we didn’t quite manage the whole distance on electric, but we still saw a hefty average fuel economy figure for the journey, helping to lift our average. With shorter trips now for food drop-offs for nearby relatives, we now regularly see triple figures for our short-trip averages.

Keeping the battery topped up means we also frequently set off with a full charge. The benefit of that is that boosts our average economy figure, the downside though means there’s no regenerative braking. Not usually a problem, but as we live at the top of a hill, I often pull the left paddle as a matter of habit when setting off. Thankfully, an on-dash alert is a reminder to use the more conventional brake pedal before we have a heart-in-mouth moment at the bottom.

nat barnes

 

Tester's notes

• When setting off on a full charge, the regenerative braking doesn’t activate which make for some hairy moments at the bottom of any early hills.

• We’re still not getting used to the Ioniq’s fidgety ride quality. Manufacturers have tended to err towards firmer rides generally, but for an everyday family hatchback, we’d like some more forgiveness.

The stats

Hyundai Ioniq Plug-in Hybrid Premium SE

P11D: £32,195

Official combined mpg: 256.8mpg

Our combined mpg: 82.4mpg

CO2: 26g/km

10 March 2020

Hyundai Ioniq LTT 2020

Call it an extended dry January, but we’ve been doing our level best to stay away from the dreaded liquid since the start of the year, though have finally had to give in.

Hyundai Ioniq LTT 2020 fuel fillerNo, we don’t mean alcohol, but putting any petrol in our long term Hyundai Ioniq Plug-In Hybrid. As outlined in our previous report, the lack of charging over our half-term holiday trip meant that we had to rely on the Ioniq’s petrol engine more than usual, hence the top up.

The Ioniq doesn’t boast a capless fuel filler like some cars, but we do like neat touches like the small hook to hang the cap on the flap as you fill up. Since then however, it has been business as usual and recharging at home to ensure that we’re running on plug-in power as much as possible.

In turn, that has seen our average fuel economy rise slightly to 79.3mpg, but also exposed the lack of charging points at local supermarkets, superstores and car parks – very noticeable since we recently moved out of London where they’re prolific. If all hybrids and EVs are to truly catch on, they need to far more prolific than they are at present, even if the statistics say that 80 per cent of drivers currently charge at home or at work. It’s just not good enough.

nat barnes

The stats

Hyundai Ioniq Plug-in Hybrid Premium SE

P11D: £32,195

Official combined mpg: 256.8mpg

Our combined mpg: 79.3mpg

CO2: 26g/km

28 February 2020

Hyundai Ioniq 2020

As Joni Mitchell rightly pointed out, you don’t know what you’ve got ‘till it’s gone. We may be driving a plug-in Hyundai Ioniq rather than a Big Yellow Taxi, but that loss has certainly been our experience with charging points since our last report.

A half-term trip to the Isle of Wight saw us load up the Ioniq to the brim, resorting to the back seat for extra luggage due to the long-but-shallow 341-litre boot. Charging points on the island aren’t overly plentiful, but we decided to pack the charging leads just in case, though those that we did try to use were either taken or not working. Instead we resorted to using a three-pin of our rented holiday home.

Hyundai Ioniq 2020 LTTEven so, a few other longer journeys have seen our average fuel economy spike, showing that the 1.6-litre four-cylinder petrol engine isn’t exactly shabby even without the extra aid of plug-in power. Using the regenerative braking whenever possible seems to help though. However, we wouldn’t mind a slightly softer ride quality – the holidays saw four passengers on board for the first time and while the extra weight did help, it’s still a little firm on rougher roads.

nat barnes

Tester's notes

• I’ve just discovered Podcasts (yes, yes I know, I’m very late to the party), but the simplicity of Apple CarPlay on the Ioniq’s system has made them our new favoured form of in-car entertainment.

• When it comes to PHEVs, nobody mentions the issue of constantly carrying the leads. When you’re tight on boot space, it becomes a pressing issue.

The stats

Hyundai Ioniq Plug-in Hybrid Premium SE

P11D: £32,195

Official combined mpg: 256.8mpg

Our combined mpg: 78.4mpg

CO2: 26g/km

3rd February 2020

Long Term Test - Hyundai Ioniq Plug-in Hybrid Premium SE - First Report - 3rd February 2020 - Main Image - Nat Barnes behind the wheel

It’s incredible how fast a new car can change your driving habits. We’re still charging our Hyundai Ioniq Plug-In Hybrid via a basic three-pin plug while we wait for a charging point, but are studiously topping it up to its maximum 31-mile electric range whenever it drops to single figures.

The recent chilly weather has exposed an irony about its systems though. When it’s cold, the 1.6-litre petrol initially fires up, only switching off once warmed up. However, even on shorter journeys, it quickly cools again, causing the engine to turn itself on once more. Our 61.4mpg average fuel economy so far isn’t bad (and is better than our other household wheels, a VW Up), but we’re hoping that improves.

A busy period of work has meant an absence of longer journeys just yet, but with a half term trip to the Isle of Wight approaching that’s about to change. It also made me wonder – with charging points at ferry points now being fitted, how long will it be before we see charging points on the ferries themselves?

Nat Barnes

The stats

Hyundai Ioniq Plug-in Hybrid Premium SE

P11D: £32,195

Official combined mpg: 256.8mpg

Our combined mpg: 61.4mpg

CO2: 26g/km

First report

Long Term Test - Hyundai Ioniq Plug-in Hybrid Premium SE - First Report - 16th January 2020 - Main Image

With the arrival of our new Hyundai Ioniq Plug-in Hybrid to the Company Car Today long-term fleet, it’s no mistake that our car park now encompasses so many battery vehicles in all their forms.

Sales of new hybrid cars rose by 17.1 per cent in 2019, with sales of ‘alternatively-fuelled vehicles’ (ie anything with a battery) taking a record 7.4 per cent market share. That figure is only going to go one way too, something that Hyundai, with its increasing and substantial line-up of hybrid and electric models, is well-positioned to exploit.

Long Term Test - Hyundai Ioniq Plug-in Hybrid Premium SE - First Report - 16th January 2020 - Charging Cables

Charging cables

We’re looking forward to exploiting the Ioniq’s 30-mile plug-in range as much as possible although we’re relying on charging via a basic three-point plug for the moment (the Ioniq comes with both cables thankfully) as we’re in the process of fitting a charging point. Thankfully, this hasn’t been the hardship we imagined though, proving that our first experience of plug-in motoring is proving easier than we thought it might.

Having said all that though, matching Hyundai’s official 256.8mpg combined average fuel economy, might be something of a challenge. We’ll give it our best shot.

nat barnes

The stats

Hyundai Ioniq Plug-in Hybrid Premium SE

P11D: £32,195

Official combined mpg: 256.8mpg

Our combined mpg: - mpg

CO2: 26g/km