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Long Term Test: Kia Xceed PHEV

Long-term test reviews

20 October 2020

Kia Xceed PHEV LTT 2020

Christmas is coming, the goose is getting fat, please put a penny in the old man’s hat.

I hate to mention the C word this early in the year, but there’s a distinct winter chill in the air and it’s having an effect on our long term Kia XCeed. Not so much that I’m in need of donations into my headwear as per the nursery rhyme, but no sooner had morning temperatures dropped into single figures than the XCeed’s engine has started automatically firing into life every time we press the starter button.

If we hadn’t already been used to this with our previous Hyundai Ioniq plug-in hybrid, we might be questioning it, but it’s still frustrating nonetheless, making you check whether the XCeed is still in EV mode. It’s due to multiple reasons, according to Kia’s engineers. It’s not only to turn the engine over when it’s cold, but it’s also to ensure there’s sufficient pressure and temperature in the brake lines and other safety systems. As the Kia isn’t fully electric, it’s still reliant on the engine for those functions.

Interestingly though, while the engine in the Ioniq would remain on for some time as it got up to temperature, the XCeed’s engine only stays on for a maximum of two minutes or so, then remains off for the rest of the journey. We’ll be keeping an eye on it as we head towards the colder months…

Nat BArnes

Tester's notes

• Our first trip to Heathrow for a work flight, saw us drop our car at long-term parking. We didn’t use it on this occasion, but the company we use offers a service to charge up your car while you’re away.

Kia Xceed PHEV LTT 2020• We love the two USB ports, so that one device can operate Apple Carplay while the other charges up.

The stats

Kia XCeed 1.6 GDI PHEV 3

P11D: £30,640

Official combined mpg: 201.8mpg

Our combined mpg: 101.6mpg

CO2: 32g/km

5 October 2020

Kia Xceed PHEV LTT 2020

Depending on who you listen to, plug-in hybrids like our long-term Kia XCeed are either something that the devil has on their drive or they’re the perfect stepping stone to total electrification.

Here at Company Car Today, we tend to fall into the latter camp, especially if you adopt a fastidious attitude to charging at every opportunity as we do. We’ve yet to recharge at a public charging point, for the obvious reason that we’ve never really had to – although with a relatively paltry 37-litre fuel tank (down from 50-litres in the standard car) you can get through a tank quite quickly when doing a lot of motorway miles. However you cut it though, our average mpg has just tipped into treble figures, which is hard to argue against.

Kia Xceed PHEV LTT 2020We’ve been undertaking lots of shorter local journeys of late, which obviously plays to a plug-in hybrid’s strengths, although the colder autumnal weather has started to make itself felt. To maximise our economy throughout summer, we’d been pretty good at avoiding the air conditioning button.

Now though, we’ve got the double-whammy of cooler temperatures meaning that our fully-charged range has dropped from 36 to 33 miles (not much admittedly, but still a 10 per cent drop) and finding that the engine sometimes fires up when first setting off – something that our previous Hyundai Ioniq used to do as well. Having said that though, even occasional longer motorway journeys haven’t seemed to dent our ever-rising average. Even for those doubters, just how do you argue against 100-plus mpg?

Nat BArnes

Tester's notes

Kia Xceed PHEV LTT 2020 apples boot• How do you like them apples? We reached peak middle class as we folded the XCeed’s back seat down to transport loads of cooking apples to a local farm to be juiced for our own apple juice.

 

2 We were impressed with our previous Ioniq PHEV’s average 110mpg during its time with us, but always had a sneaking suspicion that it had been down to our lockdown-limited mileage, however the XCeed’s performance at the pumps so far is suggesting it was no fluke.

The stats

Kia XCeed 1.6 GDI PHEV 3

P11D: £30,640

Official combined mpg: 201.8mpg

Our combined mpg: 102.0mpg

CO2: 32g/km

18 September 2020

Kia Xceed PHEV LTT 2020

Be the change that you wish to see in the world. I’m no history expert, but I’m pretty sure that Mahatma Gandhi wasn’t talking about plug-in hybrids like the Kia XCeed when he uttered that famous line, but he may as well have been.

It doesn’t take long driving the Kia XCeed for you to start changing your habits behind the wheel. From reading the road ahead better to focussing on momentum and energy regeneration, you become much more attuned to its needs than in a conventionally-engined car.

Our previous long-term wheels, a plug-in Hyundai Ioniq (see Hyundai Ioniq Long-Term Test ), had the added advantage of being able to tailor the strength of the brake energy regeneration with the paddles behind the steering wheel, which is sadly missing from this XCeed. That said, we’ve adapted to feathering the brake pedal as an alternative.

Kia Xceed PHEV LTT 2020This light touch though does seem to sometimes throw the Kia’s gearbox into slight confusion however. We rarely spend our time cornering it on the door-handles, but there have been a couple of occasions recently where the gearchanges on the automatic gearbox have been noticeably firmer than usual especially when starting off on a journey. It seems to then take a few miles for the electronics to catch up and learn that we’re not wanting to drive like Lewis Hamilton on a family trip out.

Not that we’ve got much reason to complain mind you. With our average fuel economy currently standing at 97.6mpg over 2000-plus miles so far, there are few more convincing arguments for the benefits of a plug-in hybrid than that.

Nat BArnes

The stats

Kia XCeed 1.6 GDI PHEV 3

P11D: £30,640

Official combined mpg: 201.8mpg

Our combined mpg: 97.6mpg

CO2: 32g/km

7 September 2020

Kia Xceed PHEV LTT 2020

Nobody could question the electric car revolution that’s gathering momentum at present. At the time of writing, so far this year, battery electric vehicle sales are up 157% while those of plug-in hybrids like our long-term Kia XCeed are up 67.7%.

While at a driving event recently, we parked up between a Kia e-Niro and Tesla Model 3, a trio of electrified vehicles that would have been an almost unthinkable sight just a few years ago. Yes, the market shares of EVs and PHEVs remain in single figures, but many buyers seem to be going straight to full EVs instead, rather than opt for a plug-in like our XCeed.

Having undertaken plenty of motorway miles since our last report, we can’t help but think that, for many, our XCeed’s plug-in hybrid tech will be a more tempting stepping-stone for the numerous technology cynics that still remain. Without a charging point at home (and constant delays getting one fitted – see our previous Hyundai Ioniq reports) or at our numerous destinations, a full EV would have seen us having to stop and recharge along our journeys.

Would driving a full EV see us change our habits accordingly? Probably yes. But at the same time, the back up of the XCeed’s petrol engine and its ever-improving fuel economy – even despite those plentiful motorway miles – is one of the easiest options to take. And, we suspect, the same will eventually be true for others too.

Nat BArnes

Tester's notes

• With the scorching temperatures of summer now gone, we’ve been only too glad to switch the air con off in the interests of pushing our average fuel economy ever higher.

Kia Xceed PHEV LTT 2020 fuel filler flap
• A small niggle, but we constantly forget the XCeed’s interior petrol-filler flap release button and have to walk back round to unlock it. Why doesn’t it work on the central locking like the charging flap?

The stats

Kia XCeed 1.6 GDI PHEV 3

P11D: £30,640

Official combined mpg: 201.8mpg

Our combined mpg: 91.2mpg

CO2: 32g/km

20 August 2020

Kia Xceed PHEV LTT 2020 charging

Part of the reason for us being so happy at getting a swift resolution to our Kia XCeed’s puncture plight in our previous report was that we were imminently due to leave for a few days’ holiday in Devon.

Kia Xceed PHEV LTT 2020 bootAs an annual trip, it’s not a journey we’re unfamiliar with and have undertaken it in many test cars previously, the last in a Peugeot 508. I’d be lying if I said I wasn’t slightly concerned about taking the XCeed. Not for its recently-repaired rubber, but for its boot which at 291 litres isn’t exactly what you call huge and a considerably drop from the 426 litres of the standard XCeed.

Unsurprisingly, we filled it up and used the rest of the back seat as an overflow, but once again it highlighted a drawback for PHEVs generally. That said, it’s been the only occasion of our brief time with the car so far that it has been an issue, so it’s hardly a major problem.

What has been of far more benefit though is the upside of the PHEV tech with its fuel economy – something that was frequently highlighted in Devon. Often five up, we were pretty diligent with charging regularly when back at our holiday let during our frequent round trips to the beach.

A regular journey was roughly 25 miles each way on a fast, hilly dual carriageway. The way there was spent largely on full electric mode (just), but the return journey was usually spent using the engine – and it was here that the XCeed most impressed us.

Bumping your average mpg up when you’re running mainly in electric mode is obviously fairly easy, but it’s rather harder when that has run out of charge. While there is obviously the regenerative braking to be taken advantage of, the XCeed eeks out every last volt of its battery to run on electric power whenever it can when the battery is low and the engine is used. That return journey would frequently return 68mpg-plus on the trip computer which we thought was very impressive. It seems that some PHEVs can perform when they’re out of power too.

Nat BArnes

 

Tester's notes

• Frequent charging is often key to PHEV motoring, but it seems that the XCeed’s 1.6-litre engine is pretty economical all on its own too.

• Who doesn’t like a big boot, especially anyone with a family. But the reality is, how often do you fill it to its maximum? We’re guessing not often. Yes the XCeed’s boot isn’t the largest, but it isn’t the regular drawback that you might think.

The stats

Kia XCeed 1.6 GDI PHEV 3

P11D: £30,640

Official combined mpg: 201.8mpg

Our combined mpg: 89.7mpg

CO2: 32g/km

Kia Xceed LTT 2020 flat tyre

Two days. Two blinking days. Actually I didn’t use the word ‘blinking’, I used something far more colourful. A short drive in our Kia XCeed and while negotiating a speed bump at walking pace, I heard a distinct pop.

Kia Xceed LTT 2020 flat tyreSeconds later the tyre pressure warning chime confirmed my fears. A puncture. Luckily I was virtually at my destination already and quickly parked but the air wasn’t so much leaking out as flooding. Within moments it was properly flat. After just two days and with less than 250 miles on the odometer, a brand new tyre was about to head for the scrapheap.

With the hybrid batteries taking up boot space, there was obviously no spare or space saver, only a can of filler. But from previous knowledge, I know that this negates the chance of the tyre being repaired. By sheer fluke, the local tyre agent was nearby, so a quick visit and chat with them confirmed that the best option was to fill it up as best I could with the compressor and drive it there. Very, very slowly.

Kia Xceed LTT 2020 flat tyreWith that done, they confirmed that they could repair the tyre (I could have kissed him I was so happy – well almost) and I considered it £22.50 very well spent indeed.

While waiting, aside from admiring a De Tomaso Pantera in the next door garage (when was the last time you saw one of those?), it got me thinking about plug-in hybrids and EVs generally. Most new cars have been losing their spare tyres or space savers for years as manufacturers battle to shed vehicle weight. I’ve never been a fan of tyre filler, but with hybrids and EVs using some or all of the under-floor space for batteries, those are now even more unlikely to have a space saver – or the room for one.

Nat BArnes

The stats

Kia XCeed 1.6 GDI PHEV 3

P11D: £30,640

Official combined mpg: 201.8mpg

Our combined mpg: 87.2mpg

CO2: 32g/km

23 July 2020

Kia Xceed PHEV LTT 2020

It would be a very brave person indeed that would bet against this new Kia plug-in hybrid version of the XCeed being a success. Both with company car and retail sales, the Ceed has been Kia’s best-seller in Europe for some time and with its Sportswagon estate, ProCeed shooting brake versions and this XCeed crossover, it’s hard not to see that continuing.

Add to that the seemingly insatiable appetite for crossovers and the continuing one for plug-in hybrids and this PHEV version looks even more like a winning hand. This XCeed’s 32g/km emissions and 36-mile fully charged range also give it a temptingly low BiK rate of just 10% (rising to 11% in 21/22 and 12% in 22/23) – a siren call to many company car drivers.

Kia Xceed PHEV LTT 2020That desire certainly won’t abate in the gorgeous Infra Red of our test car (a £570 option) – a hue that isn’t entirely unlike Mazda’s Soul Red – and really makes the XCeed stand out. In the meantime, over the next six months we’ll be looking forward to sky high average fuel economy (though it’ll be tough to better the 110mpg of our previous Ioniq PHEV) and crossover practicality and comfort. First though, it’s being immediately pressed into service with a baptism of fire on a family holiday to Devon.

Nat BArnes

Tester's notes

Kia Xceed PHEV LTT 2020 isofixFirst task was to install the heir’s child seat. We love the Isofix covers that automatically fold down, rather than the ones that you have to clip off and then store.

 

Kia Xceed PHEV LTT 2020 child lockAnd still on the subject of family motoring. We also love the old-school, key operated childlocks on the rear doors too – that way you know they’re definitely switched on.

 

 

The stats

Kia XCeed 1.6 GDI PHEV 3

P11D: £30,640

Official combined mpg: 201.8mpg

Our combined mpg: n/a mpg

CO2: 32g/km