Long term tests

Long Term Test: Renault Megane Sport Tourer PHEV

13 July 2021

Renault Megane PHEV LT 2021

Size is important. Or so I keep being told.

Part of the reason for me running this Megane Sport Tourer is to see whether a traditional estate car can still cut it in the current crossover-obsessed world that we all find ourselves in. However, it was also to see how it would fare in the practicality stakes too.

Renault Megane PHEV LT 2021We’ll address that family-car face-off of estates versus crossovers properly in our next report, but the Renault is a good example of how shape is just important as size when it comes to more everyday, kin-carrying motoring.

Compared to the standard Megane Sport Tourer with petrol power, the plug-in hybrid loses 116 litres of boot space with the rear seats up – 447 litres versus 563 litres – although the diesel version sits in the middle at 504 litres. Fold those seats flat and the difference grows with 1408 litres for our plug-in hybrid, then 1484 for the diesel and 1543 litres for the petrol.

That 135 litre loss certainly isn’t to be sniffed at, but in reality it’s the shape of the Megane’s boot and its everyday useability – along with a smart load cover that cleverly retracts with one tap on the leading edge – that’s more important than outright size. Well, that’s my story anyway, and I’m sticking to it.

Nat Barnes

The stats

Renault Megane Sport Tourer Iconic E-tech Plug-In Hybrid 160

P11D: £30,940

Official combined mpg: 217.3mpg

Our combined mpg: 79.6mpg

CO2: 30g/km

1 July 2021

Renault Megane PHEV LT 2021

And just like that, summer has arrived. One moment you’re wondering about Ikea instructions for build-it-yourself arks, the next you’re queuing for the ice cream van.

So far I’ve resorted to opening the Renault Megane’s windows whenever possible when driving, treating the air conditioning button like a platter of garlic bread at a vampire convention. I’ve nothing against air con as a rule, it’s just that I know the detrimental effect it can have on your average fuel economy. So when I’m trying my utmost to keep that heading upwards, I’ll be avoiding the air con whenever possible. Marginal gains and all that.

Talking of which, I’ve previously mentioned the Megane Sport Tourer Plug In’s 30-mile EV range, but not the actual tax implications of that figure. With its official 30g/km emissions, that 30 mile EV range is a crucial BIK threshold point giving it a 11% BIK rate for 21/22 rising to 12% for 22/23 and 23/24.

Even with the same emissions, any plug-in hybrid with less than that 30 mile electric range pays an extra 2% on top of that – 13% rising to 14%. A more generous person than me might shrug their shoulders at that extra 2 per cent, but I’ve always been of the opinion that money is always better in my bank account rather than the tax man’s – no matter how small. After all, that leaves more to spend on ice creams.

Nat Barnes

Tester's notes

Renault Megane PHEV LT 2021• I’ve said this before, but it’s worth repeating. I’ll always prefer the traditional tab childlocks in the door-shut rather than a switch inside the cabin. Well done Renault.

• While the Megane’s 447-litre estate boot is helpful, it wasn’t big enough for four of us plus a dog for a half term break, so we chose electric power of a different kind – a Vauxhall Vivaro-e Life.Renault Megane PHEV LT 2021

The stats

Renault Megane Sport Tourer Iconic E-tech Plug-In Hybrid 160

P11D: £30,940

Official combined mpg: 217.3mpg

Our combined mpg: 72.6mpg

CO2: 30g/km

17 June 2021

Renault Megane PHEV LTT 2021

It’s been a slightly a confusing fortnight with the Renault Megane Sport Tourer. In my last report I said that longer motorway journeys weren’t really playing to the strengths of the French plug-in hybrid.

Renault Megane PHEV LTT 2021Proving me wrong though, a couple more 100 mile-plus trips saw the Megane’s average fuel actually rise slightly rather than fall. I’d always set off with a full charge but, as previously mentioned, that would soon be depleted on faster roads, leaving the rest of each journey to be undertaken under petrol power.

The hybrid system remains something of a mystery however. I’m familiar with some plug-ins firing up their engines in colder weather or to keep some of the ancillary items ticking along, but the Renault’s 1.6-litre is never afraid to start in some very odd circumstances. It will start when pulling out of our drive or on a slight incline, I’ve even had the engine run when sitting stationary at traffic lights.

Presumably this is to use the battery power in the most efficient way possible, but it still feels a little at odds with the eco-friendly nature of the car. However, underlining that hybrid technology should perhaps not be my Mastermind specialist subject, clearly the car knows best as the upward trajectory on our average economy to 72.3mpg shows.

But the Megane perhaps doesn’t know best in other matters. Two journeys to unfamiliar places saw me rely on the built-in sat nav (rather than on a phone app) to get to my exact location and on both occasions the sat nav had glitches, taking me off route at unusual places, only to then get us to do a U turn and get back on our original route. The first time I blamed a jam that had suddenly cleared, but the second time I wasn’t convinced.

Renault Megane PHEV LTT 2021Two journeys later and Apple Carplay decided to disappear from the infotainment system. No amount of switching of cables, phones, swearing profusely, turning the system on and off or locking and unlocking the car, could make it come back. I even took the drastic measure of consulting the manual (I know, crazy right?). In the end, I just let the car stand for 24 hours and then it magically reappeared on the infotainment screen. Sometimes, the oldest solutions are the best.

Nat Barnes

The stats

Renault Megane Sport Tourer Iconic E-tech Plug-In Hybrid 160

P11D: £30,940

Official combined mpg: 217.3mpg

Our combined mpg: 72.3mpg

CO2: 30g/km

3 June 2021

Renault Megane PHEV LTT 2021

Three reports in and it’s only now that I’m just really starting to get to grips with the Renault Megane Sport Plug-In.

The switch from Iconic to RS Line trim has gained me slightly larger wheels, RS trim and some sports seats. With deep side bolsters, they’re certainly comfortable on longer journeys, but they’re also snug enough to be a reminder for me to keep a close eye on the balcony over the beltline. Time to sell the shares in Greggs…

Renault Megane PHEV LTT 2021Those longer journeys have been working against the Megane’s average fuel economy though. Officially, a full charge is meant to be up to 30 miles but, of course, venturing onto the motorway sees that drop faster than Editor Barker’s wallet thrown out of his penthouse apartment window. On faster roads, the reality can be closer to 20-22 miles.

Not much overall perhaps, but enough to mean that only a quarter of an 80-mile round trip is spent on electric power. In fact, the Megane seems to use its battery power in a slightly different way to other plug-in hybrids I’ve driven. Like other plug-in hybrids, when the majority of battery power is depleted, the Megane continuously uses any charge gained from regenerative braking, no matter how minimal, to drive the car.

What’s different though is that even with plenty of charge, the Renault’s 1.6-litre petrol engine seems keen to fire up when driving. Go anything beyond halfway on the power meter and, despite having plenty of battery charge on tap, the petrol engine starts up. Presumably it’s to maximise the best overall economy between the two, but it still feels a little counter-intuitive to us.

Either way, with more longer trips coming up, I’ll be doing my best to get that average economy figure up.

Nat Barnes

Tester's notes

Renault Megane PHEV LTT 2021 load bay• The big Megane boot is already earning its keep as the family heirloom grandfather clock had to pay a visit to the, say it carefully, clock clinic.

Renault Megane PHEV LTT 2021• Flock of Seagulls on the stereo and red stripes down the centre of the seats, the feel is all very 1980s in the Megane’s cabin.

The stats

Renault Megane Sport Tourer Iconic E-tech Plug-In Hybrid 160

P11D: £30,940

Official combined mpg: 217.3mpg

Our combined mpg: 68.9mpg

CO2: 30g/km

Renault Megane PHEV LTT 2021

First it was five minutes, this time it was five hours. As per my last report, when the Renault Megane Sport Plug-In Hybrid first got delivered, there was a fault with the alarm and the driver who had dropped it off, took it away again immediately.

He returned after three days and all was right with the Megane. Well, to begin with anyway. Then, fate had clearly decided that was enough fun and, you guessed it, the alarm kicked off once more. Infuriatingly, there was no logic to point the finger of blame towards, sometimes it would go off, other times not.

Renault Megane PHEV LTT 2021So the white Megane went back to Renault and this near-identical blue one was dropped off in its place – a Sport Tourer Plug-In Hybrid as before, but in RS Line rather than Iconic trim.

Although this RS Line car is slightly older with 5000 miles already under its wheels (the Iconic had done just 600), after a quick debate with Renault the decision was taken that rather than swap back once the Iconic had been repaired, to leave this car with us instead. With its stunning Iron Blue paintwork and nattier RS trim, we weren’t about to object.

So, a new Megane beginning starts here. Again.

Nat Barnes

The stats

Renault Megane Sport Tourer Iconic E-tech Plug-In Hybrid 160

P11D: £30,940

Official combined mpg: 217.3mpg

Our combined mpg: tbcmpg

CO2: 30g/km

6 May 2021

Renault Megane PHEV LTT 2021

Is the Megane Sport Tourer Plug-In Hybrid, embracing the very latest in high-tech or a bit old-fashioned? After all, it’s got all the advantages of a plug-in hybrid, with a 30-mile electric-only range giving it a seductive 11% BiK rate (rising to 12% for both 22/23 and 23/24), but it’s an estate when the rest of the world is going crossover-crazy.

Call me old-fashioned (plenty do), but I rather like traditional estate cars for their sheer workhorse nature – something that I’ll be putting to the test with this Renault over the coming months. And in the meantime, for all our test drives, I’ll be wearing platform shoes, a tie-dyed T-shirt and digging out a pair of my old ‘Lionel Blairs’ from the wardrobe. Well, maybe.

Although, in 30 years of testing cars, I’ve got a new record. It took all of five minutes before I had a problem with my new Renault Megane Sport Tourer Plug-In Hybrid with the alarm constantly going off.

In fact, it was so fast, that the delivery driver hadn’t left and, despite both our efforts, we couldn’t solve it. So he took it away again. Three days on, it returned fixed (a problem with the 12-volt battery due to it being so new, apparently), so it’s second time lucky.

Nat Barnes

Tester's notes

• The Arctic White metallic paintwork is a £660 option. We’ve never been a fan of white cars, so we’ll see how we get on.

Renault Megane PHEV LTT 2021• I’m thankful that the Megane is kitted out with 16in alloy wheels and not some spine-shattering, over-sized larger wheels like some rivals. We’re looking forward to a decent ride quality as a result.

The stats

Renault Megane Sport Tourer Iconic E-tech Plug-In Hybrid 160

P11D: £30,940

Official combined mpg: 217.3mpg

Our combined mpg: 62.8mpg

CO2: 30g/km