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Long term tests

Long Term Test: Toyota Yaris Cross

27th January 2022 - First Report

Toyota Yaris Cross Long Term Test - 27th January 2022 - Main Image

I’ve had a couple of weeks behind the wheel of the new Yaris Cross, Toyota’s smallest SUV and it’s a mixed bag so far.

First impressions are generally positive – the cabin layout is clean and with dials for air con (always a plus), and a clear and well layed-out central screen 8-inch screen.  A 4-inch binnacle diplay provides plenty of information including your Eco driving score, which is helpful for those with a heavier right foot.

Trim levels range from the introductory Icon, to the Design model on test here, through to Excel, Dynamic and then the top-of-the-range premium – with specs and pricing escalating accordingly. There’s slightly too much use of harder plastics for my taste, but this is a personal choice and at this price point maybe not unsuprsising.

Stowage is reasonable, although glovebox and door bins are on the smaller side and there is no cubby under the arm-rest.  There are however two central located cup-holders – perfect for stowing your morning coffee!

Toyota Yaris Cross Long Term Test - 27th January 2022 - Yaris Cross cabin has clean-lines and well laid-outThe seats are material and although they haven’t undertaken any long journeys as yet, see comfortable enough and with a good level of manual adjustment.  Rear space is adequate given the fact this is the smallest SUV in Toyota’s line-up, although rear passengers will struggle for legroom should the driver and/or passenger be in the 6ft bracket.

Dave Wallace

Tester's notes

1. The internal door handle isn’t not located in the most natural place, but slightly hidden behind the door hand rest.

2. I like the Yaris Cross name insert in the plastic trim on the rear doors – it’s a nice touch!

Toyota Yaris Cross Long Term Test - 27th January 2022 - Yaris Cross inset on rear doors looks good

The stats

Toyota Toyota Yaris Cross 1.5 Hybrid (114hp) Design

P11D: £24,140

Official efficiency: 54.6-62.8

Our efficiency: 54.4

CO2: 102-117g/km

13th January 2022 - Intro report

I’ve switched from plug-in hybrid to the “self-charging” variety with my latest long-term test car, in the guise of the new Toyota Yaris Cross hybrid.

That means there’s no requirement to plug-in and charge.  Instead, the battery charges via energy recovery as the car slows, or is topped up by the engine, allowing the car to run for a mile or so on battery power alone.  This is the first non-plug-in hybrid I’ve driven, so I’m looking forward to seeing how Toyota’s self-charging system compares to the plug-in hybrids I’ve previously driven.  One definite plus will be not having to stow wet cables on cold and wintery mornings!

Toyota Yaris Cross Long Term Test - 12th January 2022 - Image TwoThe Yaris Cross is described by Toyota as an urban SUV – all the benefits of a small car with the higher ride height offered by traditional SUVs.  As such the Yaris Cross’s credentials are going to hinge on delivering as a compact, spacious and economic hybrid, and I’m looking forward to seeing how the Toyota stacks up against this criteria.

Our urban SUV has arrived in Galactic Blue metallic paint with 17-inch bi-tone alloys, adaptive cruise-control, 8” Toyota Touch 2 multimedia system which includes Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, LED rear lights, sequential indicators, automatic high-beam, Lane Departure Alert and reversing camera.

Dave Wallace

Tester's notes

1. Somewhat surprisingly there are no reversing sensors on this trim level – personally I’d have preferred parking sensors over a parking camera

2. The plastic wheel arches give the Yaris Cross a faux off-road look in the vein of the Ford Fiesta Active

The stats

Toyota Toyota Yaris Cross 1.5 Hybrid (114hp) Design

P11D: £24,140

Official efficiency: 54.6-62.8

Our efficiency: 54.3

CO2: 102-117g/km