Afternoon round-up: Hyundai teases electric Kona, new Chevin app, Peugeot’s eye test

 

Hyundai releases teaser image of electric Kona

Hyundai has released a teaser image of the electric version of its Kona SUV, ahead of the model’s unveiling at next month’s Geneva motor show.

Due on sale in summer 2018, it is said to have a range of 470km, based to the new WLTP cycle. It will also be available with “a wide range of convenience and connectivity features as well as active safety and driving assistance technologies”.

The manufacturer said it would reveal further details about the model on 27 February.Hyundai Kona EV teaser image

Chevin launches data app

Fleet software specialist Chevin has launched an app known as Fleetwave Forms, which allows users to create data collection forms.

Ashley Sowerby - Chevin MD

Ashley Sowerby – Chevin MD

The firm said it could replace any manual or paper-based form of data collection and can be accessed offline, facilitating automatic uploads into its existing Fleetwave software system as soon as the device connects to the internet.

“[The app] bridges the communication gap between a mobile workforce and the back office, working to eliminate paper-based methods of collecting information,” said managing director, Ashley Sowerby (pictured right).

“Relying on manually intensive processes can expose an organisation to risks – not to mention the actual cost and resources involved in managing paper – however, FleetWave Forms helps to improve the management of remote workforces, at the same time reducing administrative tasks and increasing productivity.

“When compared to manual methods of fleet data collection, FleetWave Forms can be up to 92% more cost-effective”.

Drivers take their eyes off the road 7% of the time, says Peugeot

Drivers take their eyes off the road for over two miles in a one-hour journey whilst driving in urban traffic, according to eye-tracking research by Peugeot.

The manufacturer studied multiple drivers undertaking 25 identical six-mile journeys, using special glasses to analyse exactly where their eyes were looking.

The results showed that drivers take their eyes off the road 7% of the time on average.

“We all know the dangers of taking your eyes off the road, whether to adjust the radio or the temperature in the car,” said managing director, David Peel.

“When you add the continued distraction of mobile phones, talking to passengers, something catching your eye outside the car and even eating or drinking a coffee, it’s easy to see how the average driver could be in control of a car yet not be looking at the road for over 3,350 metres in a one hour journey.”

Peugeot eye-tracking test